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Boomer


Boomer came to us in May of 2012 from a shelter.  We received a call letting us know they had an older dog that “might be a golden retriever.”   Upon arrival at the shelter our transporter found a scrawny dog, cute as a button, almost hairless…just skin and bones.  He was, indeed, a golden but in very bad shape.  Boomer Too

Boomer had been brought in to the shelter by his owner who no longer wanted him because “he was 13 years old, losing weight and probably had cancer or something.”  He did have a cyst, but we suspect he had been a breeder dog left out to starve after his useful time was up.  He was taken to the vet for his intake exam and, of no surprise to anyone, he was severely malnourished (44 pounds soaking wet), he had extreme muscle atrophy and he had an ear infection.

Boomer went to his foster home and they quickly began the process of putting some meat on his bones!   He had no leash manners (probably no experience) and no interest whatsoever in toys or tennis balls.  Due to his advanced age and medical condition, it was decided that Boomer’s permanent residence would be with his foster family.

 Boomer Hanging OutWith good food, medical care and above all, a loving family, Boomer flourished in his old age.  He developed a luxurious, curly coat of fur and beautiful full withers.  He must have been quite gorgeous in his younger days; because in his old age he was a grand old man.  He enjoyed lumbering around the yard, riding in the car, going to the beach and generally getting all the affection he could handle from everyone he met.


 When it was time, Boomer went peacefully and joined so many of our alumni – knowing he had been loved.  
  

From Boomer’s Dad: ‘Like all fosters/adopters, I miss him terribly and Molly misses her “older brother.”  I was fortunate to share a few years with him and learned a lot from him.  He was a poster child for older dogs who can come into the program, adapt to their new circumstances and spread so much joy to those around them. It does take a village.  Thank you all.  We all made Boomer’s last phase of his life the very best!’

Boomer

We believe there is a permanent home for every dog that enters our program.  On very rare occasions (less than 1%) we take in a dog like Boomer whose age and chronic medical issues warrant that their home be with a permanent foster. 

Your donations to Blarney’s Fund help cover the medical expenses not only for dogs like Boomer, but all Neuse River dogs that have medical needs that go above and beyond routine care.  Thank you for considering a donation to Blarney’s Fund.